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Discover the season's freshest ingredients, from fruits and vegetables to herbs and seafood.

brussels sprouts

BRUSSELS SPROUTS

PEAK SEASON: SEPTEMBER - FEBRUARY
We love leafy greens. And especially love them when they're condensed into delicious, bite-sized buds. Harvested in September, Brussels Sprouts are a classic autumn vegetable that can be prepared in countless ways: boiled, steamed, stir fried, grilled, or roasted. Their unique look and distinctive flavor make them a memorable fall favorite. We're serving them as an irresistible side dish: Caramelized Brussels Sprouts with crispy bacon and 15-year aged balsamic. Enjoy Brussels Sprouts in season, now at Seasons 52.

cabbage

CABBAGE

PEAK SEASON: OCTOBER - FEBRUARY
It is believed that cabbage first popped up in Europe before 1000 BC, but today almost half the world's cabbage crop grows in China. That is one well-established, well-traveled vegetable. A close cousin of broccoli, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts, cabbage is a great source of vitamins K and C and dietary fiber. Pickled, braised, steamed, stewed, sautéed or eaten raw, winter is the best time to enjoy this leafy veggie.

California Golden Beets

CALIFORNIA GOLDEN BEETS

PEAK SEASON:
Beets are an important part of the Russian diet, where people often live beyond 100 years. Are beets a secret fountain of youth? You decide. What we can say for sure is that they're delicious steamed, boiled, roasted or pickled, and make a wonderful addition to a variety of dishes. California golden beets are sweeter and more mellow than red beets, with a sunny color unexpected in winter. We're serving them right now in our very popular seasonal salad with Laura Chenel goat cheese, toasted pistachios, and micro basil.

celeriac

CELERIAC

PEAK SEASON: SEPTEMBER - MARCH
It's not a vegetable you hear about every day, but what a great flavor it adds to winter dishes. Sometimes called celery root, it has a taste similar to celery and can be used in many of the same ways. Enjoy it raw, roasted, blanched, stewed or mashed. It can be stored for quite a long time, but tastes best when fresh. Beyond the delicious roots, the leaves and stems of the celeriac plant are flavorful and beautiful, and make a wonderful garnish.

citrus fruit

CITRUS FRUIT

PEAK SEASON: OCTOBER - MARCH
Oranges. Tangerines. Lemons. Limes. Their sweet and tart juiciness brighten up even the darkest winter day. The fruits we enjoy today are actually descendants from plants almost 15 million years old! They're grown in warm-weather regions all over the world, and in abundance here in North America (hello, Florida and California!). Enjoy the fruit on its own or in salads and entrees, and the juices in all sorts of recipes. Make the most of the season by bringing home all the citrus you can carry.

cranberries

CRANBERRIES

PEAK SEASON: SEPTEMBER - DECEMBER
Who can imagine holiday feasts without tart, juicy cranberry sauce? But cranberries show up in winter cuisine in all sorts of ways. Extremely tart, cranberries are most often cooked and sweetened for sauces, compotes and jellies. They add delicious tartness to savory dishes. And they make for an exceptional cocktail. This winter at Seasons 52, you'll find cranberries on our Cider-Glazed Grilled Chicken Skewers and in our seasonal Cranberry & Sage cocktail. Cheers!

florida stone crab

FLORIDA STONE CRAB

PEAK SEASON: OCTOBER - MAY
October 15 is a magical date for Stone Crab claw lovers. It's the first day of the annual harvest, and the beginning of a very limited timeframe in which to enjoy these Atlantic favorites. Fresh Stone Crab claws are very mild, slightly sweet, with a tender, flaky texture.

grapefruit

GRAPEFRUIT

PEAK SEASON: OCTOBER - MARCH
The grapefruit was an accident! An inadvertent crossing of an orange and a pumelo down in Jamaica in the 1700s. If only all mistakes had such happy outcomes. It was given the nickname "the forbidden fruit," and made its way from the Caribbean to Florida in 1823. It has since been crossed with other citrus fruits to create more hybrids like the tangelo. The grapefruit is a welcome bright spot during the cold months of winter, and we are delighted to be featuring it in our Grapefruit Negroni cocktail this season. We look forward to mixing one for you.

kumquats

KUMQUATS

PEAK SEASON: DECEMBER - APRIL
Originally from south Asia and popular throughout the Asian-Pacific region, kumquats didn't find their way to Europe and North America until the mid 1800s. A little like a very small orange but the peel is sweet and the inside is sour, making for a delightful flavor combo when eaten raw. They can also be cooked and tossed in salads, or served as a garnish for meat dishes. But most often they're used to make marmalades and jellies. Look for them in the grocery store this season and get creative.

moro blood oranges

MORO BLOOD ORANGES

PEAK SEASON: DECEMBER - MARCH
Slice open a blood orange, and you'll be treated to one of the most vibrant crimson colors in nature. And you'll taste a hint of raspberry mixed with the traditional orange citrus flavor. There are many varieties of blood oranges, the most common being Tarocco from Italy, Sanguinello from Spain and Moro, originally from Sicily. The Moro is the most colorful, most flavorful and most fragrant of the blood oranges. The flesh can be used to make marmalade, the zest can be used for cooking, and of course, simply peel and enjoy.

nantucket bay scallops

NANTUCKET BAY SCALLOPS

PEAK SEASON: NOVEMBER - MARCH
The three most common types of scallops are sea scallops, calico scallops, and bay scallops. Bay scallops are by far the sweetest, and are often referred to as the "candy of the sea." The delicious bay scallops you'll enjoy at Seasons 52 for a limited time, are gathered by The Nantucket Bay Scallop Trading Company - a family-operated business now in its 4th generation of fishermen. We know they'll bring us the most flavorful scallops Nantucket Bay has to offer, and we're delighted to serve them to you beginning November 29.

parsnips

PARSNIPS

PEAK SEASON: OCTOBER - MARCH
Closely related to the carrot and parsley, the parsnip is a cream-colored root vegetable that has been used in cooking since the ancient Romans began cultivating it (where, by the way, they were considered an aphrodisiac). A bit sweeter than carrots, parsnips were actually used as a sweetener throughout Europe before sugar cane was introduced. They can be baked, boiled, pureed, steamed, roasted, fried into chips or fermented for wine. They're featured in Christmas dinners around the world. Maybe they'll make an appearance on your holiday table this year?

pomegranate

POMEGRANATE

PEAK SEASON: OCTOBER - JANUARY
Pomegranate means "seeded apple" in Latin, but it's actually a berry. Filled with seeds. How many seeds? Anywhere from 200 to 1,400! Dried pomegranate seeds make a delicious addition to trail mix, salad, yogurt or ice cream. They can also be ground into a spice often used in Indian and Pakistani cuisine. Pomegranate juice can be enjoyed on its own, in cocktails, or made into a liqueur. At home, try separating the seeds from the peel and pulp in a bowl of water since the pulp will rise and the seeds will sink. Freezing the pomegranate overnight also helps. Have fun!

tardivo radicchio

TARDIVO RADICCHIO

PEAK SEASON: NOVEMBER - MARCH
What's red and white and enjoyed all over? The white-veined red leaves of radicchio. This leafy chicory plant has a bitter, spicy flavor when enjoyed raw in salads, but mellows when grilled or roasted. And if grown correctly, the root can be used to mix with coffee for a unique, chicory taste. The different varieties of radicchio are named for the Italian region where they originated: Chiogga, Rosso di Treviso, Tardivo, and others. Tardivo is only available in the winter months, so be sure to pick some up at the grocery store this season.

turnips

TURNIPS

PEAK SEASON: OCTOBER - MARCH
With a bitter taste similar to radishes or cabbage, turnips grow best in cool weather and are a wonderful root vegetable to enjoy during winter months. The root is high in vitamin C, and the leaves are loaded with vitamins A, C, K, folate, and calcium. You might know the leaves as "turnip greens,"- a favorite side dish in America's south during the winter months. But the leaves and, of course, the root can be enjoyed equally well north of the Mason-Dixon line.

winter squash

WINTER SQUASH

PEAK SEASON: SEPTEMBER - MARCH
The squash varietals we enjoy in summer reach full maturity in winter. While the rinds can be eaten in summer, by winter they have hardened so we focus on the delicious skin inside. Acorn, Banana, Buttercup, Kabocha, Turban, and Pumpkin are just a few of our winter favorites. The list of nutrients goes on and on; vitamins, potassium, omega-3 fatty acids, iron, beta-carotene... Incredibly versatile, there is no limit to the dishes you can prepare with these glorious gourds.