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What's good now

Discover the season's freshest ingredients, from fruits and vegetables to herbs and seafood.

Artichokes

Artichokes

PEAK SEASON: MARCH - MAY
The ancient Greeks and Romans considered artichokes food for nobility. Not a bad pedigree. Today, there are more than 50 varieties grown around the world. Eating artichoke leaves is definitely a hands-on experience: break them off one by one and draw through your teeth to enjoy the soft base of the leaf. The heart of the artichoke can be grilled, roasted, tossed into salads and soups, added to entrées, and made into dips and spreads. Come see how we're preparing artichokes this spring.

Arugula

Arugula

PEAK SEASON: MARCH - MAY
Arugula is light and sweet when young, and peppery and spicy when mature, adding depth of flavor to salads and flatbreads. But more than wonderfully flavorful, arugula is loaded with health benefits: extremely low in calories, and rich in folic acid, vitamins A, C, K, and B-complex. It's a quick-growing, cool season crop, and ready to be enjoyed right now. We've got arugula on our springtime menu. Don't miss it.

ASPARAGUS

ASPARAGUS

PEAK SEASON: APRIL - JUNE
Not many people would think of asparagus as a flowering perennial, but that's exactly what it is. In fact, it was once considered part of the lily family. Native to Europe, Northern Africa, and Western Asia, asparagus didn't find its way to the United States until the 1850s. Asparagus can be green, white, or purple - each with a different flavor profile. There are dozens of asparagus festivals you can attend in cities all across the country every spring. Or, you can simply come to Seasons 52 where asparagus are starring on our spring menu.

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

PEAK SEASON: JANUARY - MAY
There are hundreds of varietals of this annual cruciferous veggie found all over the world: 80 of them in North America. White cauliflower is the most common, but you can also find orange, green, and purple - all excellent sources of vitamin C, and a wonderful addition to any springtime menu. Cauliflower florets can be mashed until creamy, fried like rice, pureed into soups, and baked or roasted and mixed into entrées. Discover your favorite way to prepare cauliflower before the season ends.

English Peas

English Peas

PEAK SEASON: APRIL - JUNE
Because of their extremely short season, English Peas have become one of the beloved symbols of spring. They're plump, crunchy, and sweet when just picked, and tender enough to eat raw. But their sugars convert to starch pretty quickly, so it's important to enjoy them as fresh as you can get them. English Peas are a terrific source of protein, calcium, and iron. They also contain lutein to help promote healthy vision - which will come in handy when you look at our spring menu to find this year's freshest crop of English Peas.

FIDDLEHEAD FERNS

FIDDLEHEAD FERNS

PEAK SEASON: APRIL - MAY
These curly-topped delicacies are one of the first greens to push their way through the snow, signaling the arrival of a bright, new season. These tightly wound vegetables are a young fern - harvested before the frond has had a chance to mature and uncurl. They have a crisp texture, and subtle flavors of asparagus and young spinach, which makes them an ideal ingredient to feature in our spring dishes for just a short while. Read More

JICAMA

JICAMA

PEAK SEASON: DECEMBER - JUNE
Jicama is the delicious, tuberous root of the jicama vine, native to Mexico. From Mexico, it found its way to the Philippines, then on to China and other parts of Southeast Asia. Quite a world traveler. It's sweet and starchy with a wonderfully juicy crunch; some have even called it a savory apple. Once you peel its thick, papery skin, you can slice the root any way you like: sticks, rounds, diced, or sliced thin with a mandoline. Most commonly eaten raw, it will retain is crispness when cooked briefly. Discover how we're serving jicama at Seasons 52 this season.

Kale

Kale

PEAK SEASON: JANUARY - APRIL
Around since the 4th century BC, kale has enjoyed something of a renaissance lately. And why shouldn't it? Incredibly hearty and easy to grow, it can be grown winter through spring. Rich in protein, fiber, and more vitamins than we can list, it's one of the healthiest plants you can enjoy. And because it thrives in cultures around the globe, it's a delicious part of nearly every cuisine you can imagine. How are we preparing it at Seasons 52? You'll just have to come in and find out.

MEYER LEMON

MEYER LEMON

PEAK SEASON: NOVEMBER - MARCH
Believed to be a cross between a true lemon and a mandarin or orange, it was first introduced in the United States about 100 years ago by Frank Nicholas Meyer who came across the plant on a trip to China. Rounder than a true lemon, sweeter and less acidic, it adds wonderful flavor to countless foods and drinks. Enjoy Meyer lemons at Seasons 52.

PEA TENDRILS

PEA TENDRILS

PEAK SEASON: MARCH - APRIL
Also called pea shoots, these are the soft leaves, curly tendrils, and watery stems of the pea plant that are harvested before the peas develop. They have the flavor of the pea, but can be enjoyed long before the legumes are ready to be picked. So, how do you enjoy pea tendrils? They can be used in place of any soft, leafy green in just about any recipe. Raw in a salad, stir-fried in Asian entrées, or as an accent to brighten up a variety of spring dishes. This nutrient-rich, flavorful green is making an appearance on the Seasons 52 menu this season.

RAMPS

RAMPS

PEAK SEASON: APRIL - JUNE
If you're not familiar with ramps, perhaps you know them by one of their many other names: spring onions, ramsons, wild leeks, wood leeks, or wild garlic. Ramps are such an integral part of the cuisine in Appalachia, there are ramp festivals throughout West Virginia, Tennessee, Virginia, and North Carolina every spring. Tens of thousands of fans gather to celebrate the plant with a garlic odor, onion flavor, and folkloric healing properties. Find it at your local farmer's market and enjoy before the season is over.

SPRING LAMB

SPRING LAMB

PEAK SEASON: APRIL - MAY
For many people, the springtime celebrations of Easter and Passover just wouldn't be the same without lamb. In fact, lamb has been a traditional part of those holidays for thousands of years. But no holiday is needed to enjoy this springtime favorite. Spring lambs are 3-5 months old, very tender, and light in flavor. Lamb is featured in cuisines from nearly every culture in the world; from the Mediterranean and Middle East, to Australia and Asia, to Europe and the Americas. Come see how we're preparing lamb at Seasons 52 this spring.

SPRING STRAWBERRIES

SPRING STRAWBERRIES

PEAK SEASON: MARCH - MAY
Here's a fun trivia question to ask your dining companions the next time you visit Seasons 52: How many seeds are there on an average strawberry? The answer: about 200. It's actually the only fruit in the world with its seeds on the outside. Another bit of trivia for you: a strawberry isn't a berry. It's a fruit. And a very popular one at that. With a sweet flavor and vibrant color, strawberries are sensational in salads, pastries, smoothies, dressings, and in ways you might never have considered, like beverages. You'll find strawberries on the menu this spring at Seasons 52.

Sugar snap peas

Sugar snap peas

PEAK SEASON: MARCH - JUNE
Sugar snap peas are a cross between snow peas and English peas. They have round peas inside, like English peas, but the whole pod is edible, like snow peas. They're the best of both worlds. Crunchy and sweet, they should be enjoyed raw (and at great quantities!). When prepared, they should be cooked lightly to preserve the flavor, texture, and pure delight of the pea. In the spring, you'll find sugar snap peas in a range of dishes, from Asian to Italian.

WILD ALASKAN HALIBUT

WILD ALASKA HALIBUT

PEAK SEASON: APRIL - MAY
The finest wild halibut in the world live in the icy cold waters off Alaska, where fishermen spend days at a time catching their quota before bringing them to shore. Prominent in the cuisine of Alaska Natives and Canadian First Nations peoples, the fish has found its way into American cooking, and is one of the more popular fish we enjoy. Wild Alaska Halibut has a dense, firm texture, and a flavor so light and clean it needs very little seasoning. We've got Wild Alaska Halibut on our menu right now for only a short while. Fish lovers, don't miss them. Read More